"Serving all of OREGON"
OREGON  Food Handlers
Learning Objectives
Listed below are the concepts you are expected to understand after completing this course. It can be helpful
to return to this page for review prior to taking your test.

(1) Foodborne Illness Control
    (a) The food handler will be able to describe foodborne illness as an illness resulting from eating contaminated food.
    (b) The food handler will know food contaminated with organisms (known to cause illness) does not look, smell or taste different from food not contaminated.
    (c) The food handler will know that symptoms vary and may include diarrhea, vomiting, fever, cramping and nausea.
    (d) The food handler will know that depending on the cause, symptoms may develop in a few minutes to several days. Symptoms may last several days and can result in death.
    (e) The food handler will know that foodborne illness is caused by organisms known to cause illness, or is caused by chemicals.

(2) The Role of the Food Handler in Foodborne Illness Control
    (a) The food handler will be able to describe the five major mistakes that cause foodborne illness. The five major mistakes are:
      (A) Inadequate handwashing;
      (B) Employees working while ill;
      (C) Cross contamination;
      (D) Inadequate final cooking temperatures; and
      (E) Inadequate temperature control (allowing foods to be in the danger zone).
    (b) The food handler will be able to describe the activities performed by food handlers that prevent foodborne illness from happening. The activities that prevent foodborne illness are:
      (A) Proper handwashing every time hands may have become contaminated
      (B) Food handlers working only when healthy;
      (C) Storing and handling of foods in a manner to prevent contamination;
      (D) Cook each animal product to its required final cooking temperature; and
      (E) Maintaining hot and cold temperatures (keeping foods out of the danger zone).

(3) The Role of Management Control
    (a) The food handler will know that the manager sets the tone of what food safety activities occur or don't occur within the facility.
    (b) The food handler will know that the food service management is responsible for training and ensuring that food handlers practice the activities that prevent foodborne illness.

(4) Handwashing Control
    (a) The food handler will be able to identify the following as the correct technique for handwashing:
      (A) Use warm water and soap;
      (B) Scrub hands thoroughly (approximately 20 seconds); and
      (C) Dry hands with single-use towel, cloth towel roll or air dryer.
    (b) The food handler will be able to identify the following situations for when food handlers must wash their hands:
      (A) After handling raw food;
      (B) After smoking, eating, or drinking;
      (C) After handling dirty dishes or garbage;
      (D) After cleaning or using chemicals; and
      (E) Before putting on gloves.
    (c) The food handler will be able to identify the following situations for when food handlers must wash their hands twice:
      (A) After using the toilet and again when entering the work area (double handwash);
      (B) After blowing nose, sneezing, coughing, or touching eyes, nose or mouth (double handwash);
      (C) Before starting work (double handwash); and
      (D) Anytime hands come into contact with bodily fluids including cuts and burns (double handwash).
    (d) The food handler will know that a double handwash means to lather hands with soap and warm water for approximately 20 seconds, rinse, and repeat a second time. Dry hands with paper towels or air dryer.
    (e) The food handler will know that food service gloves are capable of spreading germs and do not substitute for proper handwashing.
    (f) The food handler will know that smoking, eating, and chewing tobacco is prohibited in food preparation and food and utensil storage areas.

(5) Employee Illness Control
    (a) The food handler will know to call the person in charge at the food service facility when ill with diarrhea, vomiting, fever, jaundice or sore throat with fever.
    (b) The food handler will know to not work in the food service facility while ill with these symptoms.
    (c) The food handler will know to not handle food with an infected cut or infected burn on the hands and wrists, unless an impermeable cover protects the lesion and a single-use glove is worn over the impermeable cover.

(6) Contamination and Cross Contamination Control
    (a) The food handler will be able to define and identify physical contamination as foreign objects accidentally introduced into food. Food items may arrive already contaminated with dirt, and pebbles.
    (b) The food handler will be able to define and identify cross contamination as happening when microorganisms are transferred from one food or surface to another food.
    (c) The food handler will be able to identify methods to prevent cross contamination such as wash, rinse, and sanitize utensils, work surfaces and equipment between uses.
    (d) The food handler will be able to identify the following storage conditions that will minimize the potential for cross contamination:
      (A) Store raw meats below and completely separate from ready-to-eat food in refrigeration units;
      (B) Store chemicals, cleansers and pesticides completely separate from food, utensils, and single service items; and
      (C) Properly label all chemicals, cleansers and pesticides.

(7) Final Cooking Temperature
    The food handler will be able to identify that cooking to the recommended temperature will kill disease-causing germs.


(8) Temperature Control
    (a) The food handler will be able to identify that potentially hazardous food will support bacterial growth when held at temperatures between 41 degrees F and 135 degrees F. The danger zone is any temperature between 41 degrees F and 135 degrees F.
    (b) The food handler will be able to identify that food being cooled or heated must move through the danger zone as rapidly as possible.
    (c) The food handler will be able to identify 135 degrees F or hotter as the proper temperature for hot holding potentially hazardous food.
    (d) The food handler will be able to identify 41 degrees F or colder as the proper temperature for cold holding.
    (e) The food handler will know that you cannot make food safe to eat when food has been in the danger zone for four hours or more.

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